Of Hekate in the Fall

When mountains pull autumn out of the closet
and dandelions offer summer’s last wish,
Hekate readies her torches for the fall.

Before trees bare their limbs for winter
and holly berries blush thinking of snow,
Hekate watches Persephone’s path

into the Underworld.

While Demeter mourns her daughter’s absence
and Hades delights in his wife’s safe return,
Hekate charms pines into greening

until spring sprouts once more.

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the wee notes…
– Greek Mythology says that Hekate is the goddess of the crossroads, witchcraft, ghosts… In the myth of Persephone and Demeter, Hekate helps Demeter search for Persephone after Hades takes the latter into the Underworld. The idea of Hekate as a sidekick is a bit outrageous. I make myself feel less silly by suggesting that in the myth that returns spring to the world, Hekate is important but not the main character. So please note that mythology suggests nothing (that I know of) about Hekate watching Persephone’s journey into the Underworld or charming pines. These are just my muse’s imaginings for Rommy’s prompt, at the Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, Sidekicks in the Spotlight: “take a peripheral or sidekick character… and give them a voice.”
– Linked to Poets United: Midweek Motif ~ Equinox, Equator

And if you are celebrating, like moi, have the best Autumnal Equinox
(or Verna Equinox, if you are in the Southern Hemisphere)
May Hekate’s torches shine bright, while we are playing in the dark

hecate-by-lisa-im-laerm“Hecate”, by Lisa-Im-Laerm
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Kitsune and Tea

She faery dances into the tea room, in a spring kimono made of whimsical words, winks from an onion boy, and cackles brewing out of a girl-child. There is laughter in her obi—loving mirth that wears glasses and knows to tease her middle until she squeals night songs into midday heat.

Pour your tea properly, the world says, as we tell you. She wavers, for a second made of feathers… before sticking her head into her chest and seeing that Yatagarasu’s compass still points towards the madness of her choosing. I will pour my tea with my third tail, she tells them.

She flies out of the tea room on the back of her winged heart. In her kimono, the boy blooms a pride bouquet, the girl wishes to be just like her Kitsune, and the geeky obi falls in love anew.

a chic three-legged crow
bursts out of the heart of spring
to guide her to tea

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a wee note and stuff: Today is Rommy’s birthday. Rommy loves Japanese culture, a haibun feels appropriate. I’m linking this poem to Poetizing Japanese Folklore – Dark Poetry for the Cruellest Month, 2016 (Day 12)… and The Way of Tea, hosted by the birthday girl, over at the Imaginary Garden with Real Toads. I brewed inspiration from this quote: “The questions of how to begin and what to think are matters for one’s own heart to resolve. Of oneself, for oneself—you must be your own teacher.” ~ Sen No Rikyu

Kitsune – Japanese word for fox. Stories depict them as intelligent beings and as possessing magical abilities that increase with their age and wisdom (so yeah, Rommy, just like wine).

Yatagarusa – three-legged crow (a guide) found in various mythologies and arts of East Asia.

Obi – a sash for traditional Japanese dress… part of kimono outfits.

Three-Legged Crow
“A Three-Legged Dapper Crow”
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