Tempted into Wanting

“What matters in life is not what happens to you, but what you remember and how you remember it to tell the tale.” ~ Gabriel García Márquez

.
You hid behind Sweet Dreams
and a smuggled Desire, waiting
for hearts to tempt into wanting.

My eyes often noticed your face,
but my mind couldn’t see you—
I was too young (for the world)
and you were all wrong for me.

But…

…once upon a summery night,
while exhausted and not thinking
right, I touched your Solitude…
The length of it startled all I was.
One Hundred Years all alone?
I thought, took, read you mine.

I’ve kept you close ever since,
always loving you
in word and ink, learning wild
desires and real sweet dreams.

You’ll never be lonely, my love,
words of you dance on my tongue,
feeding old blood into new ink.

You are loved.

.
the wee notes…
– I read One Hundred Years of Solitude before I was a teenager. The book and I met at a beauty salon my mother frequented. The beautician had a rack full of serialized romance novels (Sweet Dreams, Silhouette, Desire) and enough out-of-date magazines to paper the Great Wall of China and thirteen midsize castles with very small windows.
– Linked to the Imaginary Garden with Real Toads, and to Poets United.


detail from the cover of
Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude
(Ilustraciones de Fabelo edition)
via

77 thoughts on “Tempted into Wanting

  1. Oh, I love the way you describe the growth of the relationship. I had a similar experience with The Count of Monte Cristo – I read it when I was in sixth grade, but realized when I read it again as an adult that I had not understood exactly what was going on… 😉 I didn’t form any connection to it, though, so perhaps I will write a poem dedicated to another novel.

  2. Romantic..magnetic..playful..powerful words! Books truly are special relationships we carry..and inner worlds that become a part of us!

    Love your poem…especially.. ” words of you dance on my tongue”..gorgeous! I can totally picture the scene you have set at the beauty salon! The book cover is sublime, isn’t it!

    Thanks for the beautiful poetic-shimmer you have sent into my day..
    hugs

  3. You have a sangria of Marquez on your tongue–the rapture, it would seem, is mutual. How we came to read some books is a story in itself (that fascinates us if no one else). Loved the cover illustration, too.

  4. My goodness this is good!❤️ So much to love here especially; “My eyes often noticed your face, but my mind couldn’t see you— I was too young (for the world) and you were all wrong for me” and oh “I’ve kept you close ever since, always loving you in word and ink, learning wild desires and real sweet dreams.” Beautifully penned!❤️

  5. I did read this book a long time ago, and remember parts of it. I would love to reread it… it’s the only time I remember that a Nobel prize winner became an instant bestseller.

  6. wow you express the love developed for this book very well. I really love love those lines: “words of you dance on my tongue, feeding old blood into new ink.”

  7. I love the way you and the book met in a beauty salon, and that it was
    ‘… hid behind Sweet Dreams
    and a smuggled Desire, waiting
    for hearts to tempt into wanting’.
    My favourite lines:
    ‘words of you dance on my tongue,
    feeding old blood into new ink’.

  8. Now you have made me want to read it again after so many years! It will probably feel dated now but it is still good to delve into the past. Curiously after over sixty years I am catching up with school(girl) friends from my past and what a curiously satisfying feeling that gives me.

  9. Delicious poem about a distinctly rich and winding book–I did not meet Marquez until recently, and was amazed at his idiosyncratic, hugely powerful talent. Your poem captures some of the tropical heat, much of the broken heart tapestry behind, and all of the love you have for his work. I especially like the way you hid him behind such appropriately titled pulp mags.

    • He was one of a kind, wasn’t he? I love what he did with words, in fiction and nonfiction… I’m not sure I would have ever felt the way I feel about words if I had never read his work. So, I am extremely grateful for his ways.

    • Some books just don’t do it for us. I think it’s a more enjoyable book if one has read the rest of his work, for it it wonderful to see the characters (we meet in the short stories) grow in the novel…

      If you give it another chance, I would love to know about it.

  10. I loved the way in which you delved into and described your relationship with that book … so personal. The books that we love, can be that personal. And this is such a unique, inspired ‘take’ on that connection and bond. Wonderful, WONDER-FULL writing. And your note is a hoot. I literally chortled aloud as I read it.

  11. Ah, I was melting inside while reading your words…. It’s blessing to have such relationships come true. I think it’s the time for me to open again this amazing book…well, literally and metaphorically too….. Much Love!

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